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been stored in these four years of the obama administration have specifically to do with the people that he chose? bad personal choices? >> i have tried very hard -- i had a lot of disagreements with secretary geithner. i think to am always tried to do wh e thought was best for the country -- tim to do what he thought was best for the country. that was very much the regulatory framework, correcting markets, wall street is king. this will benefit us all. it was that kind of a mindset. i think we did a fresh mind said. i suggested paul volcker to be secretary of treasury. they just had a different philosophy and a different perspective about how you get to a broader economic interest. they thought taking care of wall street would take care of our economic interests. i wanted to impose some pain and suffering. tavis: how to describe -- how would you describe your relationship with tim geithner? you mentioned that you had a bumpy relationship. here is a guy who was pushing for your ouster. called the work with somebody -- how do you work with somebody who is pushing to have you ousted?
has reacted to this. but that is one of the wild cards here in this race that the obama administration and the president cannot control. gwen: except that, the upside, he's the guy with the job and hard to unseat an incumbent and the downside, he's the guy with the job? >> you saw romney try to come out early and he did make those comments seeming to suggest that obama was siding with the attackers and tried to pick this with the comment of bumps in the road. romney does seem to go from pillar to post in terms of picking on themes but doesn't necessarily carry them through and he hasn't been able to make a case that he could do a better job in handling problems in the middle east. i think most americans know it is incredibly complicated situation over there. and i don't think he has yet made a compelling argument that he could do a better job handling that. gwen: one of the things that is out of the president's control is congress and this fiscal cliff dilemma that we are about to face, by the end of the year, if they don't do something, there will be across-the-board budget cuts. has
, a former u.s. ambassador for india under the obama administration. it is a very robust defense of america's constitutional rights. how do you think it goes across the muslim world in the wake of this controversial one? >> he tried to do three things and i thought he was very effective. first, he talked about a very strong case for u.s. leadership in the world. he condemned the violence and also made the case for free speech and what that means in the world. secondly, he talked about the advancement of democracy. how that is founded on principles. and thirdly, i thought he talked very effectively to a domestic audience, a litany of achievements that he has obtained in his foreign policy, thereby strengthening his record there. contrasting what governor romney might do or what he might not do. >> as a candidate in the days of the berlin speech, he talked about the need to tear down the wall between christians and jews and muslims. but that was as high as ever. >> as ambassador to india for a few years, you see a lot of good things in the world. the ambassador was killed and i lived in india
, the obama administration is still trying to determine who was responsible for the assault on the u.s. mission in benghazi that killed a u.s. ambassador earlier this month. >> i think pretty clearly it was a terrorist attack. >> brown: at the pentagon today, defense secretary leon panetta seemed to have little doubt about what happened at the u.s. consulate in libya more than two weeks ago. >> a group of terrorists obviously conducted that attack on the consulate and against our individuals. what terrorists were involved, i think, remains to be determined by an investigation, but it clearly was a group of terrorists who conducted that attack against the facility. >> brown: what seemed clear today, though, had seemed less so just days ago. the original explanation for what happened the evening of september 11 was that an america-made movie denigrating islam had incited a mob, which had then stormed the u.s. consulate in benghazi. that attack left four americans dead, including u.s. ambassador to libya, christopher stephens. but in the weeks since, even as protests spread across the
.s. officials as an eruption of anger at an anti-islam film. the obama administration has since reversed that appraisal and now calls it a well coordinated terrorist attack. but questions have mounted over the shifting assessments. and today two republican congressmen, oversight committee chairman darrell issa of california and jays leveled new allegations. in a letter to secretary of state clinton, they charged washington rejected multiple requests for security improvements at been gas emission. they base their assertions on unidentified sources described as multiple u.s. federal government officials. the state department spokeswoman said the secretary would respond in writing this very day. >> her response is going to be relatively succinct today, as i said, expressing her complete commitment to work with the congress to get fully to the bottom of this. but i don't anticipate she'll be able to answer the specific questions today >> warner: the two congressmen say their committee will hold a hearing next wednesday on the libya attack. meanwhile the f.b.i. has sent a team to libya to det
the united states and iran is better now than it was at the beginning of the obama administration in 2000-- 2008/2009? >> i have said i don't want to talk about something that would affect-- that would affect the u.s. elections. but i can state my own desires. i think, i think that the current situation between iran and the u.s. is to both parties disadvantage. there is certainly much room for improvement. why should the u.s. government be in conflict with us i haven't really been able to understand this so far. and i'm a political person. has the united states government have any gains, i'm not saying we have had any gains. no, we certainly didn't have any gains. why should we be in conflict with each other this is a serious question. >> rose: it's a very serious question. >> after all the american politicians should sit down and answer this question. why should we disagree with one another. >> rose: and i will ask them but what about your side? what can you do, what are you prepared to do, what changes have you made in terms of your attitude about the united states. your willingness to
? >> reporter: do you get any sense that the ethanol mandate is going to change under either administration under obama or if romney would get elected? >> well is sure seems like the word ethanol has turned into a pejorative and it's not exactly the most positive topic. i just don't know that turning food into gasoline is necessarily what we want to be doing in the long term. >> reporter: and it affects this market? >> you bet it does. as corn prices go up cattle prices go up. simple as that. that's an input cost to feeding cattle is corn, so you've got to take cattle prices higher to offset that. >> reporter: thanks very much. >> you bet. >> tom: a quiet ending to the third quarter for stocks the major indices falling. the s&p 500 spent the entire session in negative territory. it made three failed attempts to get to unchanged before closing down a half percent. trading volume picked up to end the quarter. 830 million shares on the big board. just under 1.9 billion on the nasdaq. nine of the ten major stock sectors were lower today. telecommunications fell 0.8%. technology dropped 0.7% and
the al qaeda affiliate sacking the u.s. embassy, killing an ambassador. the administration did not want that story to coexist with their theme of how great an anti- terror policy obama had. they deceived the country, sending the susan rice on the sunday shows pretending that this was the outgrowth of a demonstration, when everybody over the age of nine could see that it was premeditated. that is why the story was suppressed until it could no longer be suppressed. >> i am not aware of the conspiracy, but charles has his own strange and wonderful sources -- >> how do you explain her -- >> i am going to try to answer my moderator's question about this. the problem the republicans have is that mitt romney has never cracked the threshold of being a possible commander in chief. i think it does tarnish the obama record. i think there's no question that the murder of osama bin laden took the wind out of the sales of the republican candidates. three of them decided in the wake of that not to run for 2012 because they thought he was unbeatable. it was an enormous credential for obama. but because
stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: we return to president obama's unitedded nations' speech and what it tells us about his administration's foreign policy challenges. for that we turn to harvard university professor and former u.s. ambassador nicholas burns and richard haas, president of the council on foreign relations. welcome to you both. starting with you, richard haas, let's take an overview. is the obama foreign policy defendable four years later? >> for sure it's defendable. it's not to say it's flawless. but he can point to obviously the killing of osama bin laden. he can point to, among other things, the attempt to improve relations with china and russia. obviously he's got the uwe united states out of iraq. the united states after going up has now come down to some extent in afghanistan. the middle east, even though it's turbulent, is more open than it was. so i think the president in general can point to some areas where he moved forward and some areas obviously his critics will say where he movedded back. all in all it's a defense i believe and defendable record. >> ifill
administration also would not provide additional funds to cover more recipients during a recession. in contrast to how the law currently works. president obama argues that ut c would cut coverage and services to the needy including seniors. >> here's the deal the states would be getting. they would have to be running these programs in the face of the largest cut to medicaid that has ever been proposed. a cut that according to one nonpartisan group would take away health care for about 19 million americans. 19 million. >> sreenivasan: bob green stein is the founder and president of the center on budget and policy priorities. he says governor romney's block grant proposal would hurt many patients. >> the biggest changes would be for the elderly and the disabled. the elderly and disabled are one quarter of medicaid beneficiaries but two thirds of the cost. that will rise as the population ages and there is no way you can extract savings of this magnitude without dramatickic reductions in health care for low-income people who are seniors or who have disables. >> sreenivasan: greenstein says the hea
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)